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Jordan’s Principle

A Child First Initiative

Jordan’s Principle is a child-first principle that aims to eliminate service inequities and delays for First Nations children. Jordan’s Principle states that any public service ordinarily available to all other children must be made available to First Nations children without delay or denial.

Jordan’s Principle is named in honour of Jordan River Anderson, a young First Nations boy from Norway House Cree Nation in northern Manitoba, who spent his entire life in hospital while caught in a jurisdictional dispute between the governments of Canada and Manitoba, which both refused to pay for the in-home medical care necessary for Jordan to live in his home and community.

Jordan’s Principle is a legal requirement resulting from the Orders of the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (CHRT) and is not a policy or program.

Does Your Child Require Special Care or Services?

Whether it’s healthcare, social care, education or physical or mental challenges with a child, your child may be eligible for funding and services from the Minigoziibe Anishinabe Jordan’s Principle Office. If your child is a status member of Minigoziibe Anishinabe, call us and we can help.

What Services Can We Help Your Child With?

If you have a child that needs additional supports, funding may be available to you. Some examples of what has been funded under Jordan’s Principle include:

HEALTH CARE:

  • mobility aids
  • wheelchair ramps
  • addiction services
  • services from Elders
  • mental health services
  • specialized hearing aids
  • traditional healing services
  • services for children in care
  • assessments and screenings
  • transportation to appointments
  • medical supplies and equipment
  • long-term care for children with specialized needs
  • therapeutic services for individuals or groups (speech therapy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy)

SOCIAL CARE:

  • social worker
  • land-based activities
  • personal support worker
  • specialized summer camps
  • respite care (individual or group)
  • specialized programs based on cultural
  • beliefs and practices

EDUCATION:

  • school supplies
  • tutoring services
  • teaching assistants
  • specialized school transportation
  • psycho-educational assessments
  • assistive technologies and electronics

Jordan River Anderson

Every child deserves access to services like health care and supports at school. However, First Nations children have not always had the same access to services as other Canadian children.

This is because different levels of government fund different services for First Nations children, especially those living on – First Nations.

This has led to disputes between governments about who should pay for which services.

Jordan River Anderson from Norway House Cree Nation in Manitoba got caught in one of these payment disputes. As a result, he didn’t get the recommended home-based care he needed.


The Boy Behind Jordan’s Principle

Jordan was born in 1999 with multiple disabilities and stayed in the hospital from birth. When he was 2 years old, doctors said he could move to a special home for his medical needs. However, the federal and provincial governments could not agree on who should pay for his home-based care. Jordan stayed in the hospital until he passed away at the age of 5.

In 2007, the House of Commons passed Jordan’s Principle in memory of Jordan. It was a commitment that First Nations children would get the products, services and supports they need, when they need them. Payments would be worked out later.

Today, Jordan’s Principle is a legal obligation, which means it has no end date.

While programs and initiatives to support it may only exist for short periods of time, Jordan’s Principle will always be there and will support First Nations children for generations to come.

Contact Info:

Laurie Sanderson, Case Manager
laurieasanderson@gmail.com

Tel: 204-524-2500
Fax: 204-524-2321

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